Editor:

While the argument rages in the states, hydroxychloroquine remains one of the “go-to drugs” for much of the world. Many credible studies and physicians worldwide and in America report positive results. HCQ is not a cure, but it obviously helps “flatten the curve.” You, perhaps, are unaware, because Google admits removing content that conflicts with the official word, and in America that word is “HCQ kills.”

Thus, it is banned in America for use against COVID-19. It started when Trump announced it was a possible “game-changer.” Not a peep as to why; instead Google reported that a man swallowed HCQ in a product meant to clean fish tanks, and it was adios amigo. First impressions are often set in stone, deep in the unconscious as variations of “HCQ kills” dominated the first four pages on Google and media headlines in response to our president’s endorsement.

Then headlines warned that HCQ causes heart problems. The infamous VA Study, a couple dozen critically ill vets, the New England Journal of Medicine and Lancet, all published bogus studies, quickly retracted, however, HCQ’s salient record was shredded. The heart problems were resolved when HCQ evolved from chloroquine. It has an over 50-year superlative safety record; pregnant women can take it, lupus patients take it every day and many GIs who served in Vietnam were ordered to take it. I was.

For months, the FDA allowed HCQ to be administered only to critically ill patients in hospitals. Then they even banned research for a period, claiming HCQ is too dangerous to study. ­Meanwhile, world consensus assures us that HCQ works best at early onset.

Therefore, I asked the Glenwood Springs VA Clinic to write a prescription, as I travel. I am officially at risk due to age and often far from medical help. Not only was I denied, I was assured that the VA was, perhaps, saving my life, it being a killer drug and all. I have been well cared for by the VA and realize they must follow FDA guidelines; nevertheless, here is a note to the VA: A first major study has finally been published in the U.S. The Henry Ford Health System paid attention to 2,500 COVID-19 patients. Among those who were prescribed HCQ early on, the death rate was reduced by 50%, with no heart issues (https://www.henryford.com/news/2020/07/hydro-treatment-study). Meanwhile, America suffers from one of the highest death rates per million in the world.

When citizens finally connect the dots and realize that an inexpensive drug that could have saved lives (and still can save lives) is being banned for no good reason, we will, I hope, ban those who banned it.

Will Kesler

Snowmass Village